Preserving the Eltham Avenue of Honour for future generations

Published on 10 July 2018

Avenue of Honour Eltham photo

Nillumbik Shire Council will be working with the Montmorency-Eltham RSL and other community groups over the need to replace seven trees along Eltham’s iconic Avenue of Honour.
 
An independent arborist has identified the trees as being at the end of their lives. They are in poor health, old and need to be replaced with the same species of trees to preserve the Avenue of Honour for generations to come.
 
Realising the sensitivity of the issue, Council will be liaising with the RSL, the Eltham District Historical Society and abutting businesses and residents in moving forward.
 
Mayor Peter Clarke acknowledged Council’s commitment to the much-loved Avenue of Honour and its historically significant trees.
 
“We owe it to our diggers both past and present and to the community, to maintain the Avenue of Honour for future generations,” Cr Clarke said.
 
The arborist has also identified that 24 other trees need to be pruned as part of regular maintenance. Some are growing under powerlines, others need to be encouraged to grow straighter.
 
The arborist has recommended that both the tree removal and pruning needs to be done in coming months. The trees will be replaced with mature specimens in the following planting season.
 
The Eltham Avenue of Honour dates back 101 years to 1917 when the trees were planted to honour those who served in WWI.
 
More than 100 trees were planted – including Plane trees, English Oak, Sycamore and Spanish Chestnut.
 
Sir William Irvine, former Premier of Victoria, was instrumental in the building of the Eltham War Memorial in 1919 as well as a contributor to the Avenue of Honour.
 
Over the years many of the trees have been replaced to retain the avenue as a significant living Australian War Memorial as well as a beautiful gateway to Eltham.