Reconciliation

Acknowledgement of Country

Nillumbik Shire Council respectfully acknowledges the Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung people as the Traditional Owners of the Country on which Nillumbik is located, and we value the significance of the Wurundjeri people’s history as essential to the unique character of the shire.

We pay tribute to all First Nations People living in Nillumbik, give respect to Elders both past, present and future, and extend that respect to all First Nations People.
 
We recognise that Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung people hold a deep and ongoing connection to this place.

We value the distinctive place of our First Nations people in both Nillumbik’s and Australia’s identity; from their cultural heritage and care of the land and waterways, to their ongoing contributions in many fields including academia, agriculture, art, economics, law, sport and politics.

 

 

 

Commitment to Reconciliation

Nillumbik Shire Council has a long standing commitment to Reconciliation between First Nations People and other Australians, recognising the need for an inclusive inter-related community.

Nillumbik Shire Council’s commitment to Reconciliation is outlined in the Nillumbik Shire Council Reconciliation Charter 2008 (link at bottom of page), which includes the following principles:

  1. “Nillumbik Shire Council acknowledges the Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung people as the traditional custodians of the land now known as the Shire of Nillumbik and values the significance of the Wurundjeri people's history as essential to the unique character of the Shire.”
  2. Nillumbik Shire Council recognises that residents of the shire include First Nations People from clans other than Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung, and that these people are disconnected from their own lands; in many instances this disconnection continues to impact upon them.
  3. We urge all levels of government, commerce and individuals to ensure First Nations People enjoy equal social, health and economic conditions with all Australians.
  4. We recognise the distinctive and special spiritual and material relationship that Indigenous people have with the land and the water, including trees, rocks, hills and valleys, creeks, rivers and floodplains in the Shire of Nillumbik.
  5. We recognise and value the distinctive place of First Nations people in Australia’s identity; from their cultural heritage and care of the land, to their ongoing contributions in many fields including academia, agriculture, art, economics, law, sports and politics.
  6. We respect the spiritual relationship – both historical and living - between the land and its first peoples. It is therefore important that significant cultural heritage sites within the Shire of Nillumbik are identified and mapped.
  7. Nillumbik Shire Council acknowledges the ongoing impact of past policies and practices on First Nations People, who in many instances continue to be disadvantaged by the effects of their displacement from their families, their land and traditional culture.
  8. We respect the First Nations People’s right to live according to their own values and customs, subject to the law.
  9. First People have the right to share in all levels of decision-making on matters which affect them and their communities.
  10. We acknowledge the important ongoing role of the Nillumbik Reconciliation Group and other local groups and individuals, and support their continued role in Reconciliation.
  11. Nillumbik Shire Council accepts its responsibility in ensuring these principles are adhered to and acted upon, and commits to facilitating and participating in programs and activities that confirm and display our commitment to Reconciliation and Indigenous issues.
  12. We commit to developing a Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP), consulting with Wurundjeri Woi Wurrung Elders, the Nillumbik Reconciliation Group and other stakeholders.

 

Nillumbik Reconciliation Group

The Nillumbik Reconciliation Group (NRG) is a volunteer-based, not-for-profit incorporated group committed to furthering the process of reconciliation with Australia’s Indigenous peoples, especially people traditionally from the Nillumbik area.

The group grew out of an advisory committee delegated by Nillumbik Shire Council to arrange a ceremony promoting reconciliation. As a result of the committee's recommendations, a formal document of Acknowledgement, Apology and Commitment was presented by Council to Wurundjeri elders at a Gayip (Woi wurrung word for inter-clan gathering or ceremony) in May 1998 at Wingrove Park, Eltham.

In 2008, Council unanimously passed a charter setting a reconciliation framework for all Shire initiatives and activities  (link at bottom of page). NRG continues to work with Council on an action plan promoting reconciliation in Nillumbik.

See the Nillumbik Reconciliation Group website

Email enquiries via the website

PO Box 1017
Research, 3095
Contact: 0407 682 177 President

 

Resources

  • Coranderrk and Birrarung Databases(PDF, 778KB), compiled by Mick Woiwod
    These databases are compilations of research notes, photos, anecdotes, legends, quotes as well as notes on culture, language and events focussing on the history of the Aboriginal people in the Yarra Valley region during the time of European settlement. Compiled by Mick Woiwod, historian and writer, with support from the NRG, these databases are a valuable resource, especially to anyone with an interest in the history of the area and reconciliation. More information can be found on the NRG website